Restaurant Review: Nomad Roman Pizza

After Little B was born, everyone told us that the newborn stage was the best time to take a child to a restaurant. This is why most of our Saturday outings now revolve around lunch or brunch. For now, Little B will generally sleep for at least an hour or two after she has been fed and settled in her car seat/stroller, which gives us plenty of time to enjoy a meal and a walk around the city.

We stick to casual places (B has been to Sabrina’s so many times that she already has a regular table) and try to go when it’s not too crowded (i.e. early in the day), just in case B decides to have a meltdown. When it was warmer, we sought out places with outdoor seating; it’s just a lot easier when you don’t have to steer a bulky car seat/stroller combination through narrow restaurant aisles.

This past Saturday was a bit too cold for dining al fresco, so we decided to check out Nomad Roman Pizza in Midtown Village. I have been on the hunt for a pizza like those that I fell in love with on my first trip to Rome nine years ago, so I was hoping that this much closer to home location would fit the bill.

Nomad Roman is the second Philadelphia restaurant from the team behind the Nomad Pizza truck. Its focus on hand rolled, thin-crust style pizza sets it apart from other restaurants in the a neighborhood that specialize in the thicker Neopolitan style.

The menu consists of twelve kinds of pizza that run the gamut from traditional (such as the Margherita to fancy (like the Truffle Pecorino). Each one is made to order in a copper faced, wood-fired brick oven, using ingredients from local farms.

Our server noted that each pizza generally serves one person, but that one could be sufficient for both of us if we also opted to order a salad. Since the salads sounded pretty basic (house, Caesar, arugula, etc.) we decided each order a pizza so that we could sample both the red and white varieties.

In terms of style, Nomad hits the nail on the head. The crust was thin and crispy and the center of the dough was paper thin. Somehow though, it managed to stand up to the ample amount of toppings that went all the way to the edge of the crust. The red sauce on my arugula pizza struck the perfect balance between sweet and acidic. Chester’s Truffle Pecorino pizza was quite rich, due in part of the perfectly poached egg that oozed over the entire pie.

nomad roman pizza

The only thing that was a bit different was that the server sliced the pies as they were delivered to the table, whereas pizzerias in Rome serve pies unsliced and they are eaten with a knife and fork. In this case, though, I was happy to be able to eat with one hand, as Little B woke up from her nap and I ended up holding her in my other arm throughout lunch.

b pizza

Pizzas ranges in price from $11 to $19. This is a bit more expensive than other restaurants in the area (such as Barbuzzo and Zavino) that have pizza on the menu, but the pies are a bit larger and the ingredients, although very simple for the most part, are of the highest quality. Homemade dark chocolate from Nomad’s Hopewell, NJ location was a welcome surprise at the end of the meal.

Although nothing can replace the experience of enjoying pizza in Rome itself, Nomad’s pies come pretty close to replicating the flavors of one of my favorite cities. I’m glad to have it close by, because it might be awhile before I make it to Italy again!

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